March 15th


Luis Severino – Shoulder Update

Bryan Hoch of MLB.com reported today that Brian Cashman told the media that Ace Severino will not see major league action until at least May. Thats a major blow to the Yankee rotation. Newly traded for Paxton will look to be the star of the staff until Severino comes back. Paxton is a great pitcher in his own right when healthy, he is no Severino.


MIchael A. Taylor – Injury

Today manager Dave Martinez told the media that OF Michael A. Taylor has a sprained knee and hip. While of course that is not good news, Martinez said that Taylor is expected to miss a significant amount of time. Jess Doughtery of the Washington Post was the bearer of bad news here. Unless Adam Eaton comes back healthy soon, I could easily see them turn to a trade; if this had happened a few days previous, I could have seen Washington spend $3 for Adam Jones.




Stat of the Day – Hard Hit Rate

Statcast defines a ‘hard-hit ball’ as one hit with an exit velocity of 95 mph or higher, and a player’s “hard-hit rate” is simply showing the percentage of batted balls that were hit at 95 mph or more.

Why 95 mph? Because, as the image below shows, that’s when exit velocity begins to “matter.” Another way of saying that is that balls hit at 40 mph or 70 mph will affect your average exit velocity differently, but in terms of outcomes, they’re just two varieties of weakly hit balls. For true production, you need to get to 95 mph.

You can see the value when you look at the 2018 MLB outcomes for hard-hit balls (95 mph+) and weakly-hit balls (below 95 mph).

Hard-hit balls
.524 BA, 1.047 SLG, .653 wOBA

Weakly hit balls
.219 BA, .259 SLG, .206 wOBA

TLDR: While this may seem like common sense to some people, the number REALLY support this. Look at this chart. The harder you hit a ball, it’s extremely more likely to be a hit.


Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of CBS Sports

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