March 19th


I hope you liked today’s Special Cookie!! Trout is a beast and that contract looks to be an underpay, for a such an amazing player.

Alex Bregman – Extension

The Astros and Star third basemen have come to terms for a 5 year, $100 MM extension that will begin after this season. Spanning 2020-2024, that will buy out his three arb years, and two free agent years. Bregman is one of the primer players in the game and even got him enough recognition that earned him 5th in the MVP voting for the American League. Only 25, he has really ascended to the top of the ranks since being the number 2 overall pick in 2015 out of LSU. 


Craig Kimbrel – Signing Rumors

What could become one of the best bullpens of all time, the Brewers (the *one* team that probably doesn’t need another bullpen arm) are rumored to be talking to Closer Craig Kimbrel. One thing that really jumps out to me first off, is that Craig has voiced his opinions of being used as a 9th inning only guy in the past. The Brewers (and the Rays) have really pioneered the creative bull penning that strikes this game today. One has to wonder if he would change his opinions and come into a tight situation in the 7th inning, for example. Man, the backend of a bullpen with Josh Hader, Corey Knebel, Jeremy Jeffress and Craig Kimbrel sounds so daunting. Puts them atop the NL Central in my book if they can pull it off. 

At the beginning of the offseason, it was reported that Kimbrel was looking for a 6 year, $100MM contract. The Brewers are already projected to have a franchise highest payroll entering 2019: at $127.5MM, so it looks to be like Kimbrel has come down some from that, as a lower revenue team such as Milwaukee to be linked to him. Since they will already be surrendering their top draft pick in 2019, they would only have to give up their next pick to sign him. Less than most other teams. (Don’t get me started on having to surrender draft picks to sign free agents, rant for another day).


Ryan Pressly – Extension

Another Astro extension happened today. Setup man Ryan Pressly was inked to a 2 year/ $17.5 MM. Like Bregman’s deal, it does not kick in until 2020, making him cheaper for this year; allowing the Astros to make more in-season moves without going over the Luxury tax threshold. Since getting traded to the Astros this past trade deadline, he really came into his own. It looks as though that the Astros and their cutting edge tech saw something in him; Pressly pitched to a 0.77 ERA once he got to Houston. He turned into a legit bullpen ace. 


Brandon Lowe – Signed

This one is a shocker. Reported from Ken Rosenthal (via Twitter) Brandon Lowe only has 43 days of major league time. While this could have significant value for the team, it secures Lowe’s future in case of an injury, etc. He was widely regarded as a top 100 prospect in the game, and the Rays seem to think he is that valuable. This buys out basically all of the team control that the Rays have. While he would now have a raise the first three years, up from $525,000, he potentially could really be limiting his potential payouts throughout the arb process


Notes

  • Both Jeremy Jeffress and Jimmy Nelson will open the season on the injured list, Brewers president of baseball operations David Stearns confirmed today. Jeffress is only trying to build up arm strength and is not injured per se.
  • In another Yankee ruled out for opening day (Sabathia, Severino, Ellsbury, Gregorious) and now Dellin Betances, he is facing an impingement and inflammation in his throwing shoulder.



Stat of the Day – PROJECTED HR DISTANCE

(HR-DIS) Projected Home Run Distance represents the distance a home run ball would travel if unhindered by obstructions such as stadium seats or walls. This metric is determined by finding the parabolic arc of the baseball and projecting the remainder of its flight path.

Projected Home Run Distance is a pivotal tool when comparing individual home runs. Looking at Hit Distance alone is not an optimal practice for comparing home runs. This is because each stadium has unique obstructions that prevent balls from completing a full flight path.

Of course, Major League stadiums have different climates, dimensions, wind currents and elevations, which affect the distance batted balls travel. But comparing the distances of monstrous home runs has long been a hobby of baseball fans. And Projected Home Run Distance gives us a slightly fairer way to do that.


Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of Houston Chronicle

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s