April 6th


Boston Red Sox – History

After winning the World Series in dominating fashion in 2018, the 2019 squad has now tied for their worst start in franchise history. Starting off this season at 2-8, I’m not too sure anyone could have foreseen it. It is rather surprising because of how they got better (on paper) since last year’s squad, this has really now gotten out of hand. Both the Mariners and Diamondbacks figure to be in the bottom half of the standings by the end of the year and they haven’t faced a team projected to be in the playoff picture. While the offense has been relatively good, the Red Sox have allowed 72 runs comparatively to the Rays which have allowed 19. 


Carl Edwards Jr. – Demoted

In a surprising turn of events, Edwards has been sent down to AAA Iowa. Since 2016 Edwards has been a staple in the Cubs’ pen and has been among the best relievers in the game since then. With an ERA below 3 in the last two years, he has really taken a quick regression in the first several games in 2019. In an inning and two thirds, he has already allowed 2 homers, and 5 walks meaning 6 earned runs culminating in a 32.40 ERA.


Notes 

  • Phillies Tommy Hunter is shut down indefinitely after he received a PRP injection in his pitching arm
  • Tiger’s Matt Moore has been placed on the IL with a sprained right knee
  • Rockie’s Ryan McMahon placed on IL after an elbow strain

PITCH OF THE DAY

Adam Ottovino Incredible slider



Business of Baseball – Free Agency

Definition

Players become free agents upon reaching six years of Major League service time or when they are released from their organization prior to reaching six years of service time. A free agent is eligible to sign with any club for any terms to which the two parties can agree. If a player with fewer than six years of service time signs with a club, he remains under the control of that club until reaching the requisite service time to reach free agency — even if the contract he signed does not cover the remaining years until that point.

Examples

Jason Heyward made his Major League debut on Opening Day in 2010 and never returned to the Minor Leagues. He reached six years of Major League service time at the completion of the 2015 season, at which point he became eligible for free agency. Heyward went on to sign an eight-year contract with the Cubs.

Tony Sipp was released by the Padres in May 2014 when he had between four and five years of Major League service time. The left-hander subsequently signed a guaranteed Major League contract with the Astros that ran through the end of the ’14 campaign. Because he finished the season with less than six years of Major League service time, Sipp was eligible for salary arbitration as opposed to free agency. Sipp qualified as a free agent following the 2015 season and re-signed with the Astros on a three-year deal.


Pitch of the Day Curtesy of @PitchingNinja

Business of Baseball Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of

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