April 13th


Chris Davis – Busts Streak

After a 3-4 day against the Red Sox on a day game at Fenway yesterday, Davis officially ended his streak of going 0-54. Against former Cy Young award winner Rick Porcello no less. Now the longest hitless streak for a position player, who got the first hit since September 18, 2018. Davis had signed a 7-year $161MM deal before the 2016 season. 


Touki Toussaint – Called Up

Yesterday top prospect Touki Toussaint has been recalled from Triple-A Gwinnett to man a post in the Atlanta bullpen. Touki came up for 5 starts at the end of last year and struggled with his command. He does have a top notch fastball and curve, but getting it in the zone has always been his issue. In shorter stints we will see if he can focus in a bit more, because his stuff is there to succeed.


Carlos Gonzalez – Called Up

Veteran OF Carlos Gonzalez has been called up to play in the Cleveland outfield. After being with the Rockies for the past 10 years, he will now be putting on an Indians jersey. The former MVP candidate and All Star will be called upon to help ease that dumpster fire of an outfield and lineup.


Notes 

  • CC Sabathia made his 2019 debut for the Yankees on Saturday
  • Jordy Mercer hits the IL, the Tigers announced a righty quad strain for him
  • Right Knee sprain shelves Ranger’s Roughed Odor

PITCH OF THE DAY



Reyes Moronta NINTEY ONE MPH CHANGEUP




Business of Baseball – Non-tendered

Definition

When a club “non-tenders” a player, it declines to give that player a contract for the upcoming season, thereby immediately making him a free agent. Players on the 40-man roster with fewer than six years of Major League service time must be tendered contracts each offseason by a set deadline — typically a date in early December — or non-tendered and released to the free-agent pool.

In many instances, a club will non-tender a player because it feels the raise he will receive in arbitration would be greater than his on-field value. In other cases, a club will non-tender a player simply to clear a spot on the 40-man roster — even if that player isn’t due much more than the league minimum the following season.

Examples

Henderson Alvarez was due to receive $4 million or more in arbitration following the 2015 campaign, in which he made just four starts before undergoing season-ending shoulder surgery. Rather than tender a contract to a player with major durability concerns, the Marlins non-tendered Alvarez in December 2015.

Also in December 2015, the Astros elected to non-tender first baseman Chris Carter rather than pay him a raise on his $4.175 million salary from the prior season. Carter had belted 90 homers with Houston from 2013-15, but he also batted just .218 while striking out in 33.7 percent of his plate appearances during that span.

And though James Jones was not eligible for salary arbitration and would have made scarcely more than the league minimum in 2016, the Rangers non-tendered him in December 2015 to open a 40-man roster spot for further offseason maneuvering. Texas soon re-signed Jones to a Minor League contract, keeping him in the organization without expending a 40-man roster spot.


Pitch of the Day Curtesy of @PitchingNinja

Business of Baseball Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of NBC Sports

March 29th


Justin Upton – Injury

Friday news broke that Angels LF Justin Upton will miss 8-12 weeks with turf toe. While he has been resting the past few days from it, after further inspcection he will need several months for it to heal. This is the longest I’ve heard of taking for healing turf toe; so hopefully this does not take the full 12 weeks to heal. The Halos really need that middle of the order bat with Ohtani still not back in the lineup. 


Corey Knebel – Injury

Another injury, I always hate typing these blurbs when they are on injuries. Closer/ Relief Ace Corey Knebel will now miss all of 2019 and most of 2020 with Tommy John surgery. It was reported that he went to multiple doctors to ensure there was nothing else they could do to fix his elbow without having to go full blown TJ. Agreeing to $5.125MM this year makes for potentially the same salary next year in arbitration; meaning that would be really expensive for (maybe) less than half a years worth of a recovering TJ patient: They could non-tender Knebel next year. With Kimbrel and Keuchel out there, that money could easily be re-invested in the free agents. Rumor has it that the Brewers are in talks with Kimbrel, and with this news regarding Knebel, it makes even more sense. 


Notes 

  • Dipoto of the Mariners has acquired Tom Murphy from the Giants. 
  • Mason Williams signed minor’s deal with Orioles, will report to AAA
  • Cameron Maybin finds another team with the Indians. Minor’s deal



Business of Baseball – Competitive Balance Draft picks

Competitive Balance Draft picks were implemented in the 2012-16 Collective Bargaining Agreement to create an additional way for small-market and low-revenue clubs to add talent to their organizations. The process to assign picks was amended in the 2017-21 Collective Bargaining Agreement.

The 10 lowest-revenue clubs and the clubs from the 10 smallest markets are eligible to receive a Competitive Balance pick (fewer than 20 clubs are in the mix each year, as some clubs qualify under both criteria). All eligible teams are assigned a pick, either in Competitive Balance Round A or Round B. Round A falls between the first and second rounds of the Rule 4 draft, while Round B comes between the second and third.

Under the 2017-21 CBA, six clubs will be awarded picks in Round A based on a formula that considers winning percentage and revenue. Those six teams will pick in Round A in 2017, 2019 and 2021. The remaining teams — estimated to be between six and eight — will pick in Round B in those years. The groups of teams, which will not change for the duration of the 2017-21 CBA, will switch picking in Round A and B in alternating years based on their initial assignment of round in 2017.

Clubs drafting in the Competitive Balance Rounds also receive more international bonus pool money than the minimum of $4.75 million. Those drafting in Competitive Balance Round A will receive $5.25 million, while those in Competitive Balance Round B will get $5.75 million.

Unlike other Draft picks, Competitive Balance Draft picks can be traded. However, they cannot be dealt simply in exchange for cash, and can be traded only by the club to which it was awarded. In other words, the picks may be traded no more than once.

History of the rule

Under the 2012-16 Collective Bargaining Agreement, the 10 lowest-revenue clubs and the clubs from the 10 smallest markets were entered into a lottery. The first six clubs selected in the lottery received a Draft selection in Competitive Balance Round A, while the next six clubs selected received a pick in Competitive Balance Round B.

Example

On June 1, 2014, the Marlins traded their Competitive Balance Round A selection to the Pirates in exchange for right-hander Bryan Morris. The Pirates received the 39th pick in the Draft that followed just days later.


Business of Baseball Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of LA Times

March 25th


Francisco Lindor – Ownership Status

During an interview with Zack Meisel of the Athletic (subscription link) Zack met with Indians Owner Paul Dolan. Zack asked Dolan some pretty interesting questions, but the question that got the most interesting answer was one referring to Star Shortstop Francisco Lindor. Zack asked him about whether or not there are plans to spend some big money, referring to the Machado, Harper, and Trout deals, on Lindor, and his quote was “enjoy him and then we’ll see what happens.” Dolan then said that they will be spending $300 MM deals once other teams are spending one BILLION dollar deals. That right there is not what it should be like folks.


Lucas Duda – Signed

After taking his opt out from the Twins last week, Duda has now signed with the KC Royals. Kansas City has told him that he will make the opening day roster, who he was with for the first half of 2018. Duda hit .242/.310/.413 with the same club last year before he was traded to the Braves. 


Notes

  • Andrew Romine resigns with Phillies, to avoid paying him a $100K bonus to keep him in the minors
  • Orioles select contract of Jesus Sucre; Announce Trumbo and Cobb will be placed on IL
  • Devin Mesoraco might not make the Met’s opening day roster, and will retire if not in the bigs. Mets sign Rene Rivera to take his place
  • John Axfora resigns with the Blue Jays. This time a minor league pact, he will be recovering from injury and still has hopes to make the club once recovered



Business of Baseball – 40 man Roster

The 40-man roster includes a combination of players on the 25-man roster, the 7- and 10-day injured lists, the bereavement/family medical emergency list and the paternity leave list, as well as some Minor Leaguers.

In order for a club to add a player to the 25-man roster, the player must be on the 40-man roster. If a club with a full 40-man roster wishes to promote a Minor League player that is not on the 40-man roster, it must first remove a player from the 40-man roster — either by designating a player’s contract for assignment, trading a player, releasing a player or transferring a player to the 60-day injured list.

A player who is on the 40-man roster but does not open the season on the 25-man roster must be optioned to the Minor Leagues. Only one Minor League option is used per season, regardless of how many times a player is optioned to and from the Minors over the course of a given season. Players typically have three option years, although a fourth may be granted in certain cases (usually due to injuries). Out-of-options players must be designated for assignment — which removes them from the 40-man roster — and passed through outright waivers before being eligible to be sent to the Minors.

The 40-man roster is also an important distinction in the offseason, as players who are on the 40-man roster are protected from being selected by another organization in the annual Rule 5 Draft, held each year in December at the Winter Meetings.


Business of Baseball Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of

February 24th

Slow News Sunday

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Clayton Kershaw – Update

Today, Dave Roberts (Dodger’s Manager) shed some more light on the setback that Kershaw is now facing. Roberts told the reporters that he had tried a new program to increase his velocity this season. They think that is most likely what has caused this. While he did undergo an MRI, they expect Kershaw to start throwing in a few days time. Which is great news to Dodgers fans.

 

 International Bonus Money – Orioles to Rangers

The Rangers have acquired international slot bonus money from the Orioles in exchange for minor league righty David Lebron, as per an announcement from the Orioles.

The trade represents an interesting twist for Baltimore, who has been amassing international draft money for months in various other deals in an attempt to revitalize the franchise’s long-dormant international development pipeline.  Owner Peter Angelos had long shied away from spending on int’l prospects, though the organization’s stance changed significantly once Angelos’ sons took on a larger role in the Orioles’ operations.  Under new general manager Mike Elias, the club has hired the well-regarded Koby Perez as Baltimore’s new senior director of international scouting.

After coming up short in their pursuit of Cuban prospects Sandy Gaston, Victor Victor Mesa, and Victor Mesa Jr., the O’s were left with easily the largest bonus pool of any team of the 2018-19 international signing period, with close to $6MM in available funds.  (The Dodgers were next on the list with just $1.4MM.) – Mark Polishuk, MLBTR

 


 

Stat of the Day – WAR

“Wins Above Replacement (WAR) is an attempt by the sabermetric baseball community to summarize a player’s total contributions to their team in one statistic. You should always use more than one metric at a time when evaluating players, but WAR is all-inclusive and provides a useful reference point for comparing players. WAR offers an estimate to answer the question, “If this player got injured and their team had to replace them with a freely available minor leaguer or a AAAA player from their bench, how much value would the team be losing?” This value is expressed in a wins format, so we could say that Player X is worth +6.3 wins to their team while Player Y is only worth +3.5 wins, which means it is highly likely that Player X has been more valuable than Player Y.

WAR is not meant to be a perfectly precise indicator of a player’s contribution, but rather an estimate of their value to date. Given the imperfections of some of the available data and the assumptions made to calculate other components, WAR works best as an approximation. A 6 WAR player might be worth between 5.0 and 7.0 WAR, but it is pretty safe to say they are at least an All-Star level player and potentially an MVP.

While WAR is not as complicated as some might think, it does require a good bit of information to calculate and understand. Below you can find general information about WAR and links to specific information about position players and pitchers, as WAR is obviously calculated differently for each.” – FanGraphs Library

There are two major sites that make WAR. Fangraphs and Baseball-Reference. That is why you will see “bWAR” and “fWAR”. The difference can be explained HERE

TLDR: WAR is an estimate of the total contributions that a player has made. More playing time = more WAR. It takes into account defense, base running, and of course offense. 

 

Stat of the Day Curtesy by FanGraphs

Header Photo Curtesy by Pitcher’s List