March 21st


Ichiro Suzuki – Announces Retirement

In a Mariners press release, Ichiro released this statement: 

I have achieved so many of my dreams in baseball, both in my career in Japan and, since 2001, in Major League Baseball. I am honored to end my big league career where it started, with Seattle, and think it is fitting that my last games as a professional were played in my home country of Japan. I want to thank not only the Mariners, but the Yankees and Marlins, for the opportunity to play in MLB, and I want to thank the fans in both the U.S. and Japan for all the support they have always given me.

There is not many words that can describe just how important Ichiro has been to this game. Just looking at his numbers in the MLB, he is a sure hall of famer. Add in the 6 years he played in the NPB in Japan, and he has the most hits ever. Just a glance at his baseball reference page, he was not only a perennial all star, but always in the race for MVP. After winning MVP in his rookie season, he AVERAGED 13th in MVP voting over his first 10 years; also being an All Star and Gold Glover in each of those 10 years. 


Paul Goldschmidt – Extension

Wow, this has been quite the extension season the past two weeks or so. This time, it will be the newly acquired Paul Goldschmidt with the Cardinals. 5 years and $130MM sounds about right for a 1B who has been an all star almost every year since he got to the bigs. I would rate Goldy and Arenado two of the most underrated performers in the game. Last offseason the Red Sox signed JD Martinez who is a little better hitter, but a worse fielder for 5/$110MM. This deal will not include any opt outs, but JD’s did given the dollar differences. Goldy’s deal with the Cardinals does have full no trade protection, so any deal moving him would require his permission. 


Blake Snell – Extension

Yes, another extension. After being disappointed with such a pitiful raise since winning (only) the Cy Young award in 2018; Blake Snell has come to terms with the Rays on a 5-year, $50 MM deal with several incentives and bonuses depending on his placement in the Cy Young race. This buys out all his arbitration years, and one free agent year. It looks like he will become a free agent in his age 30 season. Primed for another big payday if he continues this pitching dominance. 


Corey Knebel – Injury

Today it was reported that Brewers RP Corey Knebel has a tear in his UCL. UCL injuries scream Tommy John, but apparently the aren’t sure if it is bad enough for that. This is probably why they have entered into the Kimbrel market. If Kimbrel has lowered his ask to only one year, it would only make perfect sense for the Brewers to fill the void from Jeffress and Knebel starting the year on the IL. 


Sandy Leon – Trade Rumors

Marly Rivera of ESPN reports that the Red Sox are “actively shopping” catcher Sandy Leon. We have known since the beginning of ST that the Sox’s plan was to only carry two catchers this year. Last offseason they hashed out a multi year extension with starter Christian Vazquez, and so the battle really came down between Blake Swihart and Leon. Leon has never hit well, while when given ABs Swihart has a near average batting line. It has been clear to me that Swihart should be given the ABs when his average potential is clearly better, and has some defensive versatility: playing 1B, 2B, 3B and some OF. Sandy Leon is well regarded as a terrific defender and is heralded for handling a pitching staff. Those intangibles can only take you so far, as we are seeing here. 


Connor Joe – Traded

Today the Giants and Reds paired up to make a trade: Connor Joe will be going to the Giants, and the righty Jordan Johnson and cash will be going back to the Reds. To make room on the 40-man, Drew Ferguson will be DFA’d. In yesterday’s cookie, I talked about how Ferguson was part of the outfield logjam of guys trying to make it. It seemed like the Giants saw that logjam and turned it into a utility infielder.


Notes

  • Brad Miller Opts out of his minor league pact with the Dodgers
  • Braves Outright Sam Freeman
  • Phillies release Drew Butera, Andrew Romine
  • Hunter Pence has made Rangers’ roster




Stat of the Day – LEAD

Lead Distance represents the distance between the base and the baserunner’s center of mass as the pitcher makes his first movement — either to home or to the base on a pickoff attempt.

Lead Distance might be the most overlooked aspect of stealing bases. Certain baserunners — those who can react quickest to a pitcher’s move — take leads that are longer than an average player. In doing so, the distance between the base stealer and the base he is trying to swipe is cut down.

Sure, Maximum Speed, Acceleration, a catcher’s Pop Time and a pitcher’s delivery all have a major impact on stolen bases, too. But on a bang-bang play, the runner’s initial Lead Distance can sometimes make all the difference. (The same can hold true even when the runner is not attempting to steal, but rather when there is a close play at the next base after the ball is put in play.)


Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Photo Curtesy of 500ish Words

MARCH 20th


Eloy Jimenez – Extension

The White Sox have inked Eloy to a $43MM over 6 years deal. If you haven’t heard his name before, don’t feel bad because I am not surprised. Jimenez is one of the White Sox’s top prospects. Yes, you heard right. He is a top prospect. He has not played one game yet for the White Sox. Due to that fact of not playing a major league game yet, that deal is unprecedented.

The only other deals where a minor leaguer got a multi year extension without a day in the majors are Scott Kingery of the Phillies and Jon Singleton of the Astros. Those two players have a combined -2.5 WAR since they signed those deals, so you could say a deal like this doesn’t always benefit the team. One positive of this, is that he will not start the year in the minors now. Considering that the team does not have an incentive for the extra year of control. 


Craig Kimbrel – FA Update

Per Jon Heyman of MLB Network, talks between Kimbrel and the Brewers are “pretty serious” (tweet link)


Matt Joyce – Minor League Deal

Today the Giants announced the signing of veteran outfielder Matt Joyce. After a dreadful season with the A’s last year (.208/.322/.353 in 246 PAs), he is looking to rebound with his second team of the spring. He was with the Indians for the better part of ST so far, but the Indians told him he was not making the roster. The Giants also have signed veteran Gerardo Parra on a minor league deal, and he is also competing with a rule 5 pick Drew Ferguson. 


Notes

  • Twins released 1B Lucas Duda
  • Brewers released SP Josh Tomlin
  • Mookie Betts does not believe they will reach an extension before before he gets to free agency



Stat of the Day – SWEET SPOT

Colloquially, a player who hits the ball solidly is said to have gotten the “sweet spot” of the bat on the ball. The sweet spot classification quantifies that as a batted-ball event with a launch angle between eight and 32 degrees.

A player’s sweet spot percentage — or how often he produces a batted-ball event with a launch angle between eight and 32 degrees — is presented on Statcast leaderboards under SwSp%.

Why it’s useful

While the sweet spot classification does not include exit velocity and thus doesn’t tell the complete story of a batted-ball event, players with a high sweet spot percentage are putting themselves in greater position to succeed. In 2018, Major Leaguers posted a 1.099 slugging percentage on batted balls with a launch angle between eight and 32 degrees.

Sweet spot percentage can be used in concert with hard-hit rate — the percentage of a player’s batted balls that have an exit velocity of 95 mph or higher. For a batted-ball classification that takes into account both launch angle and exit velocity, check out barrels.


Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Photo Curtesy of CBS Sports

March 19th


I hope you liked today’s Special Cookie!! Trout is a beast and that contract looks to be an underpay, for a such an amazing player.

Alex Bregman – Extension

The Astros and Star third basemen have come to terms for a 5 year, $100 MM extension that will begin after this season. Spanning 2020-2024, that will buy out his three arb years, and two free agent years. Bregman is one of the primer players in the game and even got him enough recognition that earned him 5th in the MVP voting for the American League. Only 25, he has really ascended to the top of the ranks since being the number 2 overall pick in 2015 out of LSU. 


Craig Kimbrel – Signing Rumors

What could become one of the best bullpens of all time, the Brewers (the *one* team that probably doesn’t need another bullpen arm) are rumored to be talking to Closer Craig Kimbrel. One thing that really jumps out to me first off, is that Craig has voiced his opinions of being used as a 9th inning only guy in the past. The Brewers (and the Rays) have really pioneered the creative bull penning that strikes this game today. One has to wonder if he would change his opinions and come into a tight situation in the 7th inning, for example. Man, the backend of a bullpen with Josh Hader, Corey Knebel, Jeremy Jeffress and Craig Kimbrel sounds so daunting. Puts them atop the NL Central in my book if they can pull it off. 

At the beginning of the offseason, it was reported that Kimbrel was looking for a 6 year, $100MM contract. The Brewers are already projected to have a franchise highest payroll entering 2019: at $127.5MM, so it looks to be like Kimbrel has come down some from that, as a lower revenue team such as Milwaukee to be linked to him. Since they will already be surrendering their top draft pick in 2019, they would only have to give up their next pick to sign him. Less than most other teams. (Don’t get me started on having to surrender draft picks to sign free agents, rant for another day).


Ryan Pressly – Extension

Another Astro extension happened today. Setup man Ryan Pressly was inked to a 2 year/ $17.5 MM. Like Bregman’s deal, it does not kick in until 2020, making him cheaper for this year; allowing the Astros to make more in-season moves without going over the Luxury tax threshold. Since getting traded to the Astros this past trade deadline, he really came into his own. It looks as though that the Astros and their cutting edge tech saw something in him; Pressly pitched to a 0.77 ERA once he got to Houston. He turned into a legit bullpen ace. 


Brandon Lowe – Signed

This one is a shocker. Reported from Ken Rosenthal (via Twitter) Brandon Lowe only has 43 days of major league time. While this could have significant value for the team, it secures Lowe’s future in case of an injury, etc. He was widely regarded as a top 100 prospect in the game, and the Rays seem to think he is that valuable. This buys out basically all of the team control that the Rays have. While he would now have a raise the first three years, up from $525,000, he potentially could really be limiting his potential payouts throughout the arb process


Notes

  • Both Jeremy Jeffress and Jimmy Nelson will open the season on the injured list, Brewers president of baseball operations David Stearns confirmed today. Jeffress is only trying to build up arm strength and is not injured per se.
  • In another Yankee ruled out for opening day (Sabathia, Severino, Ellsbury, Gregorious) and now Dellin Betances, he is facing an impingement and inflammation in his throwing shoulder.



Stat of the Day – PROJECTED HR DISTANCE

(HR-DIS) Projected Home Run Distance represents the distance a home run ball would travel if unhindered by obstructions such as stadium seats or walls. This metric is determined by finding the parabolic arc of the baseball and projecting the remainder of its flight path.

Projected Home Run Distance is a pivotal tool when comparing individual home runs. Looking at Hit Distance alone is not an optimal practice for comparing home runs. This is because each stadium has unique obstructions that prevent balls from completing a full flight path.

Of course, Major League stadiums have different climates, dimensions, wind currents and elevations, which affect the distance batted balls travel. But comparing the distances of monstrous home runs has long been a hobby of baseball fans. And Projected Home Run Distance gives us a slightly fairer way to do that.


Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of Houston Chronicle

March 18th


GIO GONZALEZ – SIGNED

Finally, another free agent off the board. In a tweet from Jeff Passan of ESPN, he details that this is (surprisingly) a minor league deal! it is crazy that a player his caliber has to settle for a minor league deal. Last year he ended with a 4.16 FIP, which is NOT bad by any means. After a run with the Nationals in which he had a 3.28 FIP over three years previous to 2018, it seems like there should be some left in the tank. Gio’s deal is for $3MM plus incentives.


INDIANS AND PADRES – TRADE RUMORS

Earlier in the offseason, there were numerous reports that the Indians were shopping their two top pitchers, Kluber and Bauer, around to see if they could dump a salary or two. Since Christmas or so, those talks seemed to subside. After today’s tweet from Ken Rosenthal, they have picked back up: this time with the Padres. Ken does point out that he does not think this would happen before Opening Day next week.


NOTES

  • Dustin Pedroia will not be ready for Opening Day.
  • Dodgers announced front office promotions



Stat of the Day – Bolt

Definition: A Bolt is any run where the Sprint Speed (defined as “feet per second in a player’s fastest one-second window”) of the runner is at least 30 ft/sec.

Players’ Bolt totals for each season are displayed on the Sprint Speed leaderboard. It is a cumulative stat, unlike Sprint Speed.

Billy Hamilton finished first or second in Bolts in each of the first four seasons in Statcast history. Trea Turner ranked first in 2018, with 145 Bolts — 43 more than any other player — though he ranked fourth on the Sprint Speed leaderboard (min. 10 competitive runs).

Since Statcast was implemented Major League-wide in 2015, the number of Bolts per season typically has been similar to the number of stolen bases. For example, there were 2,377 Bolts and 2,474 steals in 2018.

TLDR: If a runner crosses 30 ft/sec he will tally a bolt. Only the fastest of the fast get that. 

Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of Federal Baseball


March 16th


Carlos Gonzalez – Signed

Today, a free agent thought to have had a place to go on a major league deal, signed a minor league deal with the Indians. Carlos Gonzalez used to be a staple in the middle of the Rockies lineup, but the past few years has slid back a bit. While he could make up to $2MM if he makes the big leagues, it is still risky if the Indians cut him in the next two weeks. Lets hope CarGo kept in shape over the offseason.


Gio Gonzalez -rumors

Gio Gonzalez, one of the top three free agents left, is now hearing some rumors of a Yankee connection. With Severino and CC Sabathia not ready for the season, they are looking to turn to two rookies: Domingo German, and Luis Cessa. While they are planning to have their regulars back by May, that is still over a month without them, and heaven forbid another starter go down during the season, you never can have too much pitching.




Stat of the Day – Hit Probability

Introduced before the 2017 season, Hit Probability is a Statcast metric that measures the likelihood that a batted ball will become a hit.

Each batted ball is assigned a percentage based on how often comparable balls have become hits since Statcast was implemented Major League wide in 2015, using exit velocity, launch angle and, on certain types of batted balls, Sprint Speed. (As of January 2019, Hit Probability now factors in a batter’s seasonal Sprint Speed on “topped” or weakly hit” balls.) For instance, a line drive to the outfield with a Hit Probability of 70 percent is given that figure because balls with a similar exit velocity and launch angle have become hits seven out of 10 times since the implementation of Statcast.

Barrels — a metric introduced in 2016 — have a combination of exit velocity and launch angle that results in a minimum Hit Probability of 50 percent, though the Hit Probability of the average Barrel is much higher (82 percent).

Why it’s useful:Hit Probability tries to get to the heart of what a pitcher and hitter control while attempting to take out the effects of defense and ballpark. Setting aside foot speed for infield hits, a batter’s impact on whether the ball was a hit or an out ends as soon as the bat makes contact. Likewise, a pitcher cannot control what happens to a batted ball after it leaves the bat.

With knowledge of the probable outcome of each batted ball, an expected wOBA can be created for each player — factoring in non-contact figures like a player’s strikeout and walk rates.

TLDR: Hit probability is what it sounds like: the chance a hit would be a hit. Sometimes batters get lucky.


Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of MLB.com

March 15th


Luis Severino – Shoulder Update

Bryan Hoch of MLB.com reported today that Brian Cashman told the media that Ace Severino will not see major league action until at least May. Thats a major blow to the Yankee rotation. Newly traded for Paxton will look to be the star of the staff until Severino comes back. Paxton is a great pitcher in his own right when healthy, he is no Severino.


MIchael A. Taylor – Injury

Today manager Dave Martinez told the media that OF Michael A. Taylor has a sprained knee and hip. While of course that is not good news, Martinez said that Taylor is expected to miss a significant amount of time. Jess Doughtery of the Washington Post was the bearer of bad news here. Unless Adam Eaton comes back healthy soon, I could easily see them turn to a trade; if this had happened a few days previous, I could have seen Washington spend $3 for Adam Jones.




Stat of the Day – Hard Hit Rate

Statcast defines a ‘hard-hit ball’ as one hit with an exit velocity of 95 mph or higher, and a player’s “hard-hit rate” is simply showing the percentage of batted balls that were hit at 95 mph or more.

Why 95 mph? Because, as the image below shows, that’s when exit velocity begins to “matter.” Another way of saying that is that balls hit at 40 mph or 70 mph will affect your average exit velocity differently, but in terms of outcomes, they’re just two varieties of weakly hit balls. For true production, you need to get to 95 mph.

You can see the value when you look at the 2018 MLB outcomes for hard-hit balls (95 mph+) and weakly-hit balls (below 95 mph).

Hard-hit balls
.524 BA, 1.047 SLG, .653 wOBA

Weakly hit balls
.219 BA, .259 SLG, .206 wOBA

TLDR: While this may seem like common sense to some people, the number REALLY support this. Look at this chart. The harder you hit a ball, it’s extremely more likely to be a hit.


Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of CBS Sports

🚨 ALERT COOKIE🚨 – March 14th


major deal – rule changes

A BIG DEVELOPMENT HAPPENED TOAY: Jeff Passan of ESPN announced several changes to the game we love. In a rare mid-CBA agreement, MLB and the Players Union came to the agreement that three majors things will happen: 3-batter minimum, single trade deadline, and changes to All-Star weekend including bonuses to the winner of the HR Derby.

Steve Adams from MLB Trade Rumors gave a great concise update to what is happening now, and in 2020:

Effective Immediately

  • There will be no trades after July 31. August trade waivers have been eliminated, though players can still be placed on and claimed from outright waivers, as they would throughout the rest of the year.
  • All-Star voting will still be conducted by fans online, but the top three players at each position, in each league, will now participate in an All-Star Election Day. The top three vote-getters at each position, in each league, (top six in the case of outfielders) will receive bonus payments.
  • The Home Run Derby will now come with $2.5MM of prize money, including a $1MM prize for the winner.
  • The maximum number of mound visits per game will be reduced from six to five.
  • Commercial breaks between innings are reduced to two minutes in length for all games.
  • The MLB and MLBPA will form a “Joint Committee” to discuss further issues and rule changes.

Effective Beginning in 2020

  • The standard roster size in regular season games and postseason games will increase from 25 to 26 players. Beginning on Sept. 1, roster size will expand further to a 28-player maximum (as opposed to the current 40). A maximum number of pitchers will be designated by the Joint Committee. (Passan reported that the league has proposed no more than half a team’s players can be pitchers.)
  • Position players are only eligible to pitch in extra innings or when a team is leading or trailing by seven or more runs. Certain position players may be designated as “two-way players,” but to be eligible, they’ll need to have accrued at least 20 innings pitched and started 20 games as a position player/designated hitter in the current season or the preceding season (including at least three trips to the plate in each of those lineup appearances).
  • A pitcher must face at least three batters per appearance unless he is removed due to injury or the half-inning in which he is pitching ends before three batters have come to the plate.
  • The minimum length of stay for pitchers who are optioned to the minors or placed on the injured list will increase from 10 days to 15 days. This change is still “subject to input” from the newly formed Joint Committee.

Michael Fulmer – Injury

After last fall’s surgery to repair his knee, today Manager Ron Gardenhire announced that they will be shutting Fulmer down to revamp his lower half mechanics. He had drastically lower velocity so far this spring, so it’s apparent that the Tigers see something different, or new in his mechanics which could be surgery aftermath, or that is just now exaggerated after his knee getting repaired.


Vladimir Guerrero Jr. – sent down

Today the Blue Jays officially sent down top prospect and phenom Vladimir Guerrero Jr. to minor league camp. While it was expected that he would not begin the year in the majors, due to service time issues; because of his oblique injury, it is a bit sooner than anticipated.




Stat of the Day – Pop Time (POP)

On steal or pickoff attempts by a catcher, Pop Time represents the time elapsed from the moment the pitch hits the catcher’s mitt to the moment the intended fielder is projected to receive his throw at the center of the base.

When a throw’s flight path ends in front of or beyond the base’s midpoint, Statcast accounts for the thrown ball’s speed and projects how long the throw would have taken to reach the center of the intended base.

Pop Time is a combination of a catcher’s footwork (getting into throwing position), Exchange (glove to release), and Arm Strength (velocity of throw). Pop Time is a much better assessment of a catcher’s ability to throw out baserunners than the strength of his arm alone. A catcher with a great arm isn’t going to throw out many baserunners if it takes him a while to transfer the ball to his throwing hand and then release the throw.

A catcher with a good Pop Time doesn’t always throw out baserunners, however. A large part of his success is dependent upon the runner’s speed, the throw’s accuracy and the pitcher’s delivery length. But with a quick Pop Time and an accurate throw, a catcher is doing what he can to stop the opposing running game.

Below are the five best average pop times to second base on stolen-base attempts (min. 15 SB attempts at 2B) from the 2017 season. The MLB average in 2017 was 2.01 seconds.

TLDR: Pop time measures how fast the catcher received, and then got the ball to the intended receiver. Anything below 2 seconds is above average, and anything below 1.9 seconds is considered elite.


Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of Cubs Insider

March 13th


Tony Sipp – signed

Today the Nationals inked a $1.25MM deal with the southpaw Tony Sipp today. Primarily a LOOGY the past several years, he has more than excelled in that role. Last year with Houston he racked up a 2.41 FIP in 38.2 IP. What can be looked at though, is the 0.9 WAR in only that many innings is pretty impressive. Sipp’s primary role could be in danger though if the rumored 3 batter minimum for pitchers goes into effect. Sipp’s deal also includes a $2.5MM mutual option for 2020 with a $250K buyout.


Charlie Morton – Last Contract

In a rare missed story by Mookie’s Cookie, yesterday Charlie Morton told Jon Morosi of MLB Network that this contract he has with the Tampa Bay Rays will be his last. While he is getting up there in age, this will only be his 35th season. After being a middle of the pack starter, and fighting some injuries for most of his career, the past two years he has really come into his own. Posting back to back 3+ WAR seasons in Houston, he turned that into a 2 year deal worth $30MM with Tampa.


roster manipulation

Today both the White Sox and Mariners have sent down prospects with what seems to be fronts to keep the player for an extra year. The Mariners sent J.P. Crawford, who is only 5 weeks in the minors away from giving his team an extra year. The White Sox sent one of their very much ready prospects down to AAA too; Eloy Jimenez who CRUSHED the minors last year. MLB Trade Rumors has this to say about him:

[Jimenez, 22, is not only considered to be among the game’s premier prospects but is also largely believed to be ready for MLB action. The Dominican-born slugger obliterated Double-A and Triple-A pitching in 2018, posting ridiculous slash lines of .317/.368/.556 and .355/.399/.597 at those respective levels.] – Steve Adams, MLB Trade Rumors




Stat of the Day – Win EXPECTANCY

Win Expectancy (WE), otherwise known as Win Probability, indicates the chance a team has to win a particular game at a specific point in that game.

Expressed as a percentage, Win Expectancy is calculated by comparing the current game situation — with the score, inning, number of outs, men on base and run environment all considered — to similar historical situations. More specifically, the percentage is derived from the number of teams that faced a comparable situation in the past and went on to win the game.

Win Expectancy is the basis for Win Probability Added (WPA), which quantifies the percent change in a team’s chances of winning from one event to the next. For example, if a team’s Win Expectancy jumps from 30 percent before a home run to 70 percent after, the player who hit the homer would have a WPA of 0.40 for increasing his team’s chances of winning by 40 percent.

TLDR: While this stat does not help you predict the future value of player, its really fun use it to see how great that awesome comeback was that your team made.


Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of MLB Youtube

March 12th


Shohei Ohtani – Raise

2-way phenom Shohei Ohtani gets a raise to play in his second season here in America. Originally signed for much cheaper than he would have in free agency (because he is so young), he will now make $650K instead of the MLB minimum at $555K. Its is not a lot but it is more than the MVP candidate Alex Bregman got ($640,500).

Sammy Solis – Minor League Deal

Today the Padres announced a minor league deal with lefty reliever Sammy Solis. After mysteriously being released by the nationals, it came to light that it was all in good faith. Nationals manager Dave Martinez told reporters that he knew that he was not making the opening day roster this year, and wanted to give him a chance to make another squad. The Padres have a deep bullpen this year, but it is still possible to make their team.

Francis Martes – Suspended

Right hander Francis Martes has been found positive to have banned substance Clomiphene in his system. He will be suspended 80 games. MLB Trade Rumors has a great writeup of his profile:

[Martes was considered one of baseball’s premier pitching prospects prior to the 2017 season, landing inside the top 40 on the pre-2017 rankings from Baseball America, MLB.com, ESPN and Baseball Prospectus. His stock has dropped since that time, however, as Martes pitched to an ERA well north of 5.00 in both Triple-A and the Majors in ’17 before logging a 6.75 ERA in four Triple-A starts last season. The arm injury that ultimately necessitated his Tommy John procedure limited Martes to just 19 2/3 innings in 2018.] – Steve Adams, MLB TR




Stat of the Day – Ballpark Factor

Ballpark factor, at its most basic, takes the runs scored by Team X (and its competitors) in Team X’s home ballpark and divides the figure by the runs scored by Team X and its competitors in Team X’s road contests. Often times, that number will be ever-so-slightly adjusted if a team doesn’t play the same opponents at home as on the road.

For example: In 2018, 849 runs were scored at Coors Field, and 676 runs were scored in Rockies games away from Coors Field. Coors Field had a park factor of 1.271, when looking at runs scored.

The same exercise can be done with other stats, such as home runs, triples, doubles, etc.

Why it’s useful: Park factor is a great way of determining the extent to which a stadium favors hitters or pitchers. It isn’t affected by the teams or players involved, because those teams and players are also playing games in other stadiums. It simply compares how easy it is to score, from one ballpark to another.

Stat of the Day Curtesy of MLB.com

Header Photo Curtesy of ESPN.com